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History's Happenings for September 4

Electric Lighting Brought To NYC
1882

Thomas Edison

In 1882, Thomas Edison installed his first large-scale power-generating dynamos in downtown Manhattan for a demonstration street-lighting project, using the new incandescent lamp he had invented three years earlier. The project was a success, and now one can see New York from outer space!

Edison was a proponent of the use of DC power, which he defended as being safer than AC. However, his views lost out to the greater ability of AC power to be transmitted over long distances.

Los Angeles Founded By Spanish
1781

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Geronimo Surrenders
1886

Chiricahua Apache chief Geronimo

The legendary Geronimo was chief of the Chiricahua Apache tribe, living in what became the state of Arizona. Born in 1829, his family was killed by Mexicans in 1858 and he began a life of sporadic raids on Mexican and American settlements. Eventually his ardor faded and he settled on a reservation.

In 1876, however, the U.S. government began the multiple relocations of the Chiricahua that moved them first to New Mexico, then to Florida and Alabama, and finally to Ft. Sill, Oklahoma. Geronimo and his small band of followers resisted the move from their traditional home in Arizona, and resumed their raids on American settlements. On one occasion, Geronimo was taken only to escape two days later.

On this day in 1886, he was finally captured near the Mexican border by a force under General Nelson Miles. He joined his tribe in their later relocations, eventually adopted Christianity and wrote a book about his life. He died in 1909.

Eastman Patents Kodak Camera
1888

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First Live Coast-to-Coast TV Broadcast
1951

President Harry S Truman

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Ford Begins Hawking Ill-Fated Edsel
1957

Edsel's granddad Henry -- not quite the success of the Model-T

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Troops Block Little Rock High School
1957

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Labor Day

The idea of Peter J. McGuire, then-president of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, Labor Day was recognized as a national holiday by Act of Congress on June 28, 1894

The first Labor Day parade was held on September 5, 1882 in New York City.




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