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The
AMERICAN'S CREED

by William Tyler Page

Document Start    Return to Library

Uncle Sam The United States entered World War I, by declaring war on Germany, on April 6, 1917.

Support for the war was not universal, especially since the new Congress had been elected on a platform of non-belligerency.  Socialists, Pacifists and some German- and Austrian-Americans actively worked against American military and economic interests.  The Espionage Act was passed on June 17.

Mr. Page was Clerk of the U. S. House of Representatives at the time, when he wrote this creed. The House adopted the creed on behalf of the American people on April 3, 1918.

Its original purpose is not entirely clear today, other than perhaps to remind folks that loyalty is a precondition of being an American.  Many of the words are borrowed from earlier American documents and addresses, and some of its contents could stand clarification. Hidden in its folds is an interesting reference to "sovereign states" which is seldom encountered outside of the Confederate Constitution.

Nonetheless, its last sentence should be as true today as it was in 1917.



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The
AMERICAN'S CREED
by William Tyler Page
I believe in the United States of America as a government of the people, by the people, for the people; whose just powers are derived from the consent of the governed; a democracy in a republic; a sovereign nation of many sovereign States; a perfect union, one and inseparable; established upon those principles of freedom, equality, justice, and humanity for which American patriots sacrificed their lives and fortunes.

I therefore believe it is my duty to my country to love it, to support its Constitution, to obey its laws, to respect its flag, and to defend it against all enemies.

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